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Talks related to infectious diseases
Updated: 41 min 2 sec ago

Tue 07 Jun 12:00: Kambo Wong (TBC)

Wed, 11/05/2022 - 14:41
Kambo Wong (TBC)

Abstract not available

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Wed 11 May 16:00: What kind of distance underlies influenza transmission in the US?

Mon, 09/05/2022 - 13:24
What kind of distance underlies influenza transmission in the US?

For directly transmitted infectious diseases such as influenza, understanding how best to incorporate human mobility into spatial transmission models is needed for better epidemic prediction and control. The gravity model is a popular spatial framework that assumes the force of infection from one population to another decays with the distance between them, but the choice of distance metric can affect the predicted dynamics. Conventionally, great-circle distance is used, but humans don’t generally travel in a straight line. In this talk, we evaluate driving distance and driving time against great-circle distance as gravity model distance metrics by testing their ability to predict influenza dynamics in the US with fine-scale influenza-like-illness medical claims data. I will show that driving distance metrics can offer better model fits to infectious disease spread compared to great-circle distance, but that simulated predictions remain similar. However, the choice of distance metric can matter more depending on the terrain and the nature of the disease spread.

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Fri 08 Jul 16:00: Capsid and the inhibition of retroviral replication Prof Jonathan Stoye, The Francis Crick, London. Hosted by Prof Paul Lehner

Mon, 09/05/2022 - 10:59
Capsid and the inhibition of retroviral replication

Abstract not available

Prof Jonathan Stoye, The Francis Crick, London. Hosted by Prof Paul Lehner

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Wed 18 May 16:00: Genome-led vaccine target discovery for parasitic infections This is a hybrid talk. You can attend in person or via zoom. See abstract for details

Fri, 06/05/2022 - 10:31
Genome-led vaccine target discovery for parasitic infections

The livelihoods of millions of people living in Africa are at risk due to infectious diseases that affect the health of livestock animals which provide them with essential food, milk, clothing and draught power. One major livestock disease is animal African trypanosomiasis (AAT) which is primarily caused by two species of blood-dwelling Trypanosome parasites: T. vivax and T. congolense that affect goats, sheep and especially cattle. AAT is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa and is estimated to cause annual productivity losses of up to $600 million, a burden that falls primarily on the poorest. The few drugs that are available to treat AAT are not satisfactory: they cause serious side effects and parasite resistance to these drugs is increasing. There is a widely-held view that vaccinating against these parasites is unachievable due to the presence of a highly abundant parasite cell surface glycoprotein which can serially switch to a large repertoire of antigenically distinct forms that are clonally expressed. I will show using a systematic genome-led reverse vaccinology approach and a murine infection model that vaccinating with non-variant cell surface proteins used as subunit vaccines can attenuate T. vivax infection, including one that is capable of eliciting sterile protection. We will present research that describes the discovery of these vaccine candidates and our progress in understanding the immunological mechanisms of protection that are elicited by this vaccine.

This talk will be broadcasted via Zoom. Please use this link to gain access.

This is a hybrid talk. You can attend in person or via zoom. See abstract for details

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Wed 04 May 16:00: Estimating global spatial dynamics and vaccine-induced fitness changes of Bordetella pertussis using genetic data.

Tue, 03/05/2022 - 09:35
Estimating global spatial dynamics and vaccine-induced fitness changes of Bordetella pertussis using genetic data.

Bordetella pertussis (Bp), which causes whooping cough, infects >24 million individuals annually despite widespread vaccination. Asymptomatic carriage and multiple circulating lineages hide the underlying dynamics of Bp from surveillance systems. Therefore, the extent of spread across spatial scales remains a mystery, as does the role of vaccines in driving changes in strain fitness. Models informed by pathogen sequences can help. In this seminar I will present how models informed by >3300 genomes shed light on Bp spatial structure, rate of geographic spread, and fitness shifts in response to vaccine changes. Link to the paper: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/scitranslmed.abn3253

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Wed 15 Jun 16:00: TBC This is a hybrid talk. You can attend in person or via zoom. See abstract for details

Fri, 29/04/2022 - 19:03
TBC

Abstract not available

This is a hybrid talk. You can attend in person or via zoom. See abstract for details

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Wed 18 May 16:00: TBC This is a hybrid talk. You can attend in person or via zoom. See abstract for details

Fri, 29/04/2022 - 18:30
TBC

This talk will be broadcasted via Zoom. Please use this link to gain access.

This is a hybrid talk. You can attend in person or via zoom. See abstract for details

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Wed 04 May 16:00: Taming your intestinal parasite - building the tools to study Cryptosporidium Canceled

Fri, 29/04/2022 - 11:32
Taming your intestinal parasite - building the tools to study Cryptosporidium

This talk will be broadcasted via Zoom. Please use this link to gain access.

Canceled

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Wed 18 May 12:30: T cells in the brain

Thu, 21/04/2022 - 09:10
T cells in the brain

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Wed 11 May 13:00: The future of cancer screening: stratified, pan, both or neither?

Tue, 12/04/2022 - 11:15
The future of cancer screening: stratified, pan, both or neither?

Register in advance for this free online seminar:

https://phgfoundation.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYtdOyrqjovEtQkA-Iv94T1fjMaOVTNOsRf

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

In this seminar Professor Peter Sasieni will briefly review the current landscape regarding cancer screening. He will then consider the potential for stratifying screening using either polygenic risk scores to differentiate between those with a low, average, or high risk of cancer, or the post-test risk of cancer to offer stratified management. Finally, he will review the potential to expand the scope of cancer screening by adding either new single-site screening programmes or a multi-cancer early detection test. The question of whether a pan-cancer screening test would dissipate the benefit of using polygenic risk scores to stratify screening will also be discussed as will the challenges of reducing screening as risk changes.

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Wed 27 Apr 16:00: Hunting the Silent Killer: Investigating Chagas disease in a murine model This is a hybrid talk. You can attend in person or via zoom. See abstract for details

Fri, 08/04/2022 - 17:30
Hunting the Silent Killer: Investigating Chagas disease in a murine model

Chagas disease, caused by infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is the most important parasitic infection in the Western hemisphere. An estimated 6-7 million people are infected and the disease is emerging as a global threat. Infection is lifelong and between 30-40% of those infected go on to develop life-threatening cardiac or digestive pathology. There is no vaccine and only two drugs, both of which are toxic and both are activated by the same parasite enzyme. Hence there is a need for good pre-clinical animal models which recapitulate the human disease and can be used to examine mechanisms of immunity, pathogenesis and drug action. We have developed murine models for both cardiac and digestive forms of the disease using highly sensitive bioluminescent reporter parasites that allow for the dynamics of the infection to be monitored for months in individual animals. The model has been further developed for analysis of host-pathogen interactions at the cellular level by incorporation of dual bioluminescence/fluorescence reporters. We have utilised this model to examine the effects of treatment on cardiac pathology and we have been able to analyse parasite replication within the tissues. We are currently using this system to examine the immunology of the infection and to identify mechanisms of immune evasion.

This talk will be broadcasted via Zoom. Please use this link to gain access.

This is a hybrid talk. You can attend in person or via zoom. See abstract for details

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