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Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Identified through Study on Untreated Sewage 2 April 2019

last modified Aug 16, 2019 02:05 PM
A study published in Nature Communications on 8th March has shown how studying genes related to antimicrobial resistance in untreated sewage can identify the spread of antimicrobial resistance in healthy populations

Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Identified through Study on Untreated Sewage -  02 April 2019

A study published in Nature Communications on 8th March has shown how studying genes related to antimicrobial resistance in untreated sewage can identify the spread of antimicrobial resistance in healthy populations.The study's findings suggest that global antimicrobial resistance gene diversity and abundance vary by region, and improving sanitation and health could limit the global burden of antimicrobial resistance.

Through examining the genetic data in the sewage of 74 cities across 60 countries, the researchers were able to estimate patterns of resistant bacteria across different regions. The highest antimicrobial resistance levels were found in Nigeria, Tanzania and Vietnam. The countries having the most divergent distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes were Brazil, India and Vietnam, suggesting that these countries could be hot spots for emergence of novel antimicrobial resistance mechanisms.

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