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Cambridge Infectious Diseases

An Interdisciplinary Research Centre at the University of Cambridge

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Researchers to explore the role of wild birds in the spread  of avian flu viruses

Researchers to explore the role of wild birds in the spread of avian flu viruses

Cambridge researchers are working with leading Georgian scientists to address key questions about the ecology and evolution of avian flu.

Researchers to explore the role of wild birds in the spread of avian flu viruses - Read More…

Structure of important trypanosome receptor solved

A collaboration between scientists in Cambridge, Oxford and New York has determined the structure of a crucial Trypanosome receptor. The findings, published recently in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences have revealed the structure of a crucial receptor found on the surface of trypanosome.

Structure of important trypanosome receptor solved - Read More…

Cambridge researchers support the WHO

Cambridge researchers support the WHO

A newly designated Collaborating Centre at the University of Cambridge will support the World Health Organization (WHO) in detecting and responding to major epidemic- and pandemic-prone diseases.

Cambridge researchers support the WHO - Read More…

Cambridge scientists join major international push to maximise bioscience research that helps world's poorest farmers

Researchers in the Department of Plant Sciences at the University of Cambridge have been awarded two grants geared towards managing crop disease from the BBSRC-led programme called 'Sustainable Crop Production Research for International Development' (SCPRID).

Cambridge scientists join major international push to maximise bioscience research that helps world's poorest farmers - Read More…

Science Writing Competition Winners Announced

Science Writing Competition Winners Announced

Congratulations to Liam Hurst and Adele Wang, winners of our Cambridge Infectious Disease Science Writing Competition

Science Writing Competition Winners Announced - Read More…

CID partners in holistic research to tackle zoonoses in Africa

CID partners in holistic research to tackle zoonoses in Africa

Cambridge Infectious Diseases has become a key partner in an innovative, multidisciplinary £3.2m research consortium exploring the connections between ecosystems, health and poverty in Africa.

CID partners in holistic research to tackle zoonoses in Africa - Read More…

Tracking MRSA in Real Time

Tracking MRSA in Real Time

In study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, Cambridge researchers demonstrate that whole genome sequencing can provide clinically relevant data on bacterial transmission within a timescale that can influence infection control and patient management.

Tracking MRSA in Real Time - Read More…

Grants take Cambridge in Africa Programme to next level

Grants take Cambridge in Africa Programme to next level

The University of Cambridge's wide-ranging and long-term strategy of engagement with African higher education institutions moved into its next phase following the recent announcement of a $1.2 million grant by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and a $1 million grant by The Alborada Trust.

Grants take Cambridge in Africa Programme to next level - Read More…

Let’s talk about science: how public engagement can work for you.

Let’s talk about science: how public engagement can work for you.

Public engagement is an often thrown about term. Research councils are increasingly requiring some level of ‘community engagement ‘ as a condition of grant allocation, but what exactly does it involve, and how easy is it to accomplish without detracting from your research? The high turnout at the annual Cambridge Science Festival is an excellent example of opportunities for scientist to engage with an enthusiastic public, but ‘public engagement’ covers a broad range of activities, and there are plenty of opportunities to try them out. I spoke to several Cambridge Infectious Diseases members about their experiences with public engagement to find out what it involves, and why they do it.

Let’s talk about science: how public engagement can work for you. - Read More…

Q&A Tropical medicine and artemisinin resistance in Thailand

Professor Nick Day is the Director of the Wellcome Trust major overseas programme in Thailand and Laos/The Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medical Research Unit. The unit has over 500 members of staff, and is largely geared towards clinical research. Nick is also a member of the Cambridge Infectious Diseases steering committee.

Q&A Tropical medicine and artemisinin resistance in Thailand - Read More…

Cambridge in Africa

Cambridge in Africa

Professors David Dunne, James Wood, and Dr Pauline Essah explain why, in the quest for understanding infectious diseases, Africa may hold the answers.

Cambridge in Africa - Read More…

A novel MRSA in cows...where do we go from here?

A novel MRSA in cows...where do we go from here?

This month, we interviewed Dr Mark Holmes from the Department of Veterinary Medicine. Mark was recently interviewed on the Today programme about his involvement in a recent study of divergent strains of MRSA, published in the Lancet Infectious Diseases.

A novel MRSA in cows...where do we go from here? - Read More…

New clue in the battle against Australian Hendra virus

New clue in the battle against Australian Hendra virus

A new study on African bats provides a vital clue for unravelling the mysteries in Australia’s battle with the deadly Hendra virus.

New clue in the battle against Australian Hendra virus - Read More…

First Annual Cambridge Infectious Diseases Invited Lecture Announced

First Annual Cambridge Infectious Diseases Invited Lecture Announced

Dr Paul Newton (Wellcome Trust Overseas Programme, Laos) and Aline Plancon (Interpol) have been invited to Cambridge to discuss the challenges of fake antimicrobial drugs.

First Annual Cambridge Infectious Diseases Invited Lecture Announced - Read More…

Malaria's achilles heel revealed?

Malaria's achilles heel revealed?

Researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, have revealed a key discovery in understanding how the most deadly species of malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, invades human red blood cells.

Malaria's achilles heel revealed? - Read More…

Cartographers of the infectious world

Cartographers of the infectious world

Cambridge scientists, and their map-making skills, are contributing to an annual worldwide public health endeavour – the race to select a vaccine against seasonal flu.

Cartographers of the infectious world - Read More…

Addenbrooke's Abroad announces its partnership with the Humanitarian Centre

Addenbrooke's Abroad is delighted to announce its partnership with the Humanitarian Centre for its Cambridge Global Health Year

Addenbrooke's Abroad announces its partnership with the Humanitarian Centre - Read More…