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Updated: 40 min 12 sec ago

Wed 18 May 10:00: CCBI/C2D3 Computational Biology Annual Symposium 2022

Mon, 09/05/2022 - 15:56
CCBI/C2D3 Computational Biology Annual Symposium 2022

Our popular annual symposium is back in person in 2022!

Date: Wednesday 18th May 2022

Location: Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA

Register to attend in person: https://tinyurl.com/compbio2022

Register to attend online: https://tinyurl.com/compbio2022online

This one-day event reflects the strength and diversity of research in computational biology, taken broadly, both within Cambridge University and beyond.

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Mike Boemo (Pathology) – Mapping DNA Replication Stress with Nanopore Sequencing and Deep Learning
  • Bianca Dumitrascu (Computer Science) – From multimodality to mechanism in genomics
  • Keynote: Serena Nik-Zainal (Medical Genetics) – Mutational signatures in human cells
  • Kiran Patil (MRC Toxicology) – Towards predicting evolution using first-principle models
  • Mihaela van der Schaar (DAMTP) – Using ML to discover the underlying models of medicine
  • Renske Vroomans (SLCU) – The evolutionary dynamics shaping multicellular development
  • Yo Yehudi (Open Life Science) – Building open communities and empowering your contributors with open principles

    + two speakers from the Mathematical Genomics and Medicine PhD programme

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Wed 18 May 16:00: Genome-led vaccine target discovery for parasitic infections This is a hybrid talk. You can attend in person or via zoom. See abstract for details

Fri, 06/05/2022 - 10:31
Genome-led vaccine target discovery for parasitic infections

The livelihoods of millions of people living in Africa are at risk due to infectious diseases that affect the health of livestock animals which provide them with essential food, milk, clothing and draught power. One major livestock disease is animal African trypanosomiasis (AAT) which is primarily caused by two species of blood-dwelling Trypanosome parasites: T. vivax and T. congolense that affect goats, sheep and especially cattle. AAT is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa and is estimated to cause annual productivity losses of up to $600 million, a burden that falls primarily on the poorest. The few drugs that are available to treat AAT are not satisfactory: they cause serious side effects and parasite resistance to these drugs is increasing. There is a widely-held view that vaccinating against these parasites is unachievable due to the presence of a highly abundant parasite cell surface glycoprotein which can serially switch to a large repertoire of antigenically distinct forms that are clonally expressed. I will show using a systematic genome-led reverse vaccinology approach and a murine infection model that vaccinating with non-variant cell surface proteins used as subunit vaccines can attenuate T. vivax infection, including one that is capable of eliciting sterile protection. We will present research that describes the discovery of these vaccine candidates and our progress in understanding the immunological mechanisms of protection that are elicited by this vaccine.

This talk will be broadcasted via Zoom. Please use this link to gain access.

This is a hybrid talk. You can attend in person or via zoom. See abstract for details

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Thu 12 May 16:00: Kendrew Lecture 2022: Chemogenetic and optogenetic technologies for probing molecular and cellular networks

Tue, 26/04/2022 - 16:27
Kendrew Lecture 2022: Chemogenetic and optogenetic technologies for probing molecular and cellular networks

Where a protein is localized in the cell exerts tremendous influence over its function, interaction partners, dynamics, and modifications. Enzyme-catalyzed proximity labeling (PL) has emerged as a powerful and generalizable method to map the locations and interactions of endogenous proteins in the context of living cells, applicable to even membraneless organelles and transient interactions that are inaccessible to traditional methods such as affinity purification. I will give a brief account of PL method development, including directed evolution of the PL enzymes APEX and TurboID, and then describe new efforts to extend PL to RNA and proteome trafficking. In the second part of the talk I will describe recent work on the development of scalable, single-cell molecular recorders of past cellular events, and the application of these recorders to neuroscience and mitochondrial biology.

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