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Updated: 28 min 54 sec ago

Wed 05 Jul 13:00: Gene-based vaccines to combat bacterial diseases, hurdles and opportunities’ Canceled - to be re-scheduled

Tue, 07/02/2023 - 16:59
Gene-based vaccines to combat bacterial diseases, hurdles and opportunities’

With the recent success of adenoviral vaccines against Ebola and SARS -CoV-2, the potential of this platform in the fight against outbreak pathogens is being realised. This technology has proven impact in high income countries and is also suitable for large scale manufacture and use in low-and-middle income countries, as demonstrated by the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine against SARS -CoV-2. The potential of viral-vectors to induce T Helper type 1 and high antibody responses in humans makes the use of this approach attractive in efforts to combat the disease and disability caused by bacterial pathogens. However, the case for their use in bacterial vaccines is less clear: the expression of a bacterial protein in a eukaryotic cell may impact on the antigen localization, induce unwanted glycosylation or affect protein conformation, and this is also true if using the mRNA vaccine platform. The potential and challenges of adenoviral vectors was explored against two bacterial diseases, capsular group B meningococcus and the plague. While all antigens and combinations were able to induce high antibody responses after a single dose immunisation in mice, not all were able to induce functional antibodies. We show that a subset of outer membrane proteins from Gram-negative bacteria can be incorporated into gene-based vectors for novel vaccine development. While our work highlights the challenges inherent in developing novel vaccines using this technology and can be applied to mRNA, the successful progression of two novel bacterial vaccines to clinical development underlines the potential of these platforms for vaccine development against bacterial diseases.

Canceled - to be re-scheduled

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Wed 08 Feb 16:00: Can small RNAs help address the big issues in helminth parasite control? This is a hybrid talk. You can attend in person or via zoom. See abstract for details.

Wed, 01/02/2023 - 12:34
Can small RNAs help address the big issues in helminth parasite control?

Understanding how parasites interact with and survive within their hosts is a key challenge for parasitologists. Much effort is directed towards decoding the parasite “secretome” – the repertoire of molecules secreted by parasites to aid their survival. Helminth parasite secretomes are now known to contain several RNA species in addition to classically recognised proteins, lipids and sugars. These molecules are essential contributors to parasite-host communication, but also represent potential biomarkers which could contribute to improved detection and diagnosis of parasitic infections. Our team focuses on the secreted micro (mi)RNA component of helminth secretomes, through RNA sequencing of plasma from experimentally- and naturally-infected animals. I will present data from two representative species: Fasciola hepatica, a trematode liver fluke, and Strongyloides ratti, a gastrointestinal nematode. I will present our latest insights from longitudinal plasma miRNA sequencing datasets from both species, from the dual perspectives of how extracellular miRNAs could allow parasites to control host gene expression, and how we might apply these data to improved parasite diagnostics and control.

We encourage in person attendance but the talk will also be streamed via zoom

This is a hybrid talk. You can attend in person or via zoom. See abstract for details.

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Wed 08 Feb 12:00: Inference on compartmental models: COVID-19 modelling at Sussex

Fri, 27/01/2023 - 10:48
Inference on compartmental models: COVID-19 modelling at Sussex

During the COVID -19 pandemic, we developed an epidemiological model for the Sussex area to assist the local authorities on demand and capacity planning for hospitals and mortuaries. The model exhibited a good predictive power, and it is based on re-formulating traditional compartmental models in terms of the observable data to obtain robust inference schemes. In this talk, I will illustrate the approach using the basic SIR model as an example, and I will discuss how we applied this approach at Sussex.

  • Speaker: Eduard Campillo-Funollet, Lancaster
  • Wednesday 08 February 2023, 12:00-13:00
  • Venue: Zoom.
  • Series: Worms and Bugs; organiser: Paula Smith.

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Tue 07 Feb 12:30: Standing at the crossroads: having defined their pathogenicity at length, can we now exploit the beneficial properties of Burkholderia bacteria?

Thu, 19/01/2023 - 10:09
Standing at the crossroads: having defined their pathogenicity at length, can we now exploit the beneficial properties of Burkholderia bacteria?

The presentation will outline the problematic nature of Burkholderia bacteria as cystic fibrosis lung infection pathogens, plant disease causing agents, and industrial contaminants of pharmaceuticals and home/personal care products. This will be contrasted with the beneficial properties of Burkholderia bacteria as antibiotic producers, biopesticides and plant-beneficial bacteria. Using genetics and genomics to untangle the negatives versus the positives of their biology will be highlighted, and ultimately lead to a discussion on whether genetic modification can be used to create safe Burkholderia biopesticides in future.

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Wed 08 Feb 13:00: Gene-based vaccines to combat bacterial diseases, hurdles and opportunities’

Mon, 19/12/2022 - 15:01
Gene-based vaccines to combat bacterial diseases, hurdles and opportunities’

With the recent success of adenoviral vaccines against Ebola and SARS -CoV-2, the potential of this platform in the fight against outbreak pathogens is being realised. This technology has proven impact in high income countries and is also suitable for large scale manufacture and use in low-and-middle income countries, as demonstrated by the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine against SARS -CoV-2. The potential of viral-vectors to induce T Helper type 1 and high antibody responses in humans makes the use of this approach attractive in efforts to combat the disease and disability caused by bacterial pathogens. However, the case for their use in bacterial vaccines is less clear: the expression of a bacterial protein in a eukaryotic cell may impact on the antigen localization, induce unwanted glycosylation or affect protein conformation, and this is also true if using the mRNA vaccine platform. The potential and challenges of adenoviral vectors was explored against two bacterial diseases, capsular group B meningococcus and the plague. While all antigens and combinations were able to induce high antibody responses after a single dose immunisation in mice, not all were able to induce functional antibodies. We show that a subset of outer membrane proteins from Gram-negative bacteria can be incorporated into gene-based vectors for novel vaccine development. While our work highlights the challenges inherent in developing novel vaccines using this technology and can be applied to mRNA, the successful progression of two novel bacterial vaccines to clinical development underlines the potential of these platforms for vaccine development against bacterial diseases.

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Thu 09 Feb 13:30: Humoral immunity in the lung; spatiotemporal regulation of resident memory B cell responses to infection with influenza virus This webinar will take place in the Kings Hedges Room please contact seminars@babraham.ac.uk to request site...

Wed, 07/12/2022 - 14:53
Humoral immunity in the lung; spatiotemporal regulation of resident memory B cell responses to infection with influenza virus

Dr Tal Arnon PhD is a Wellcome Trust Investigator and an associate Professor at the Kennedy Institute in the University of Oxford. She obtained her PhD from The Hebrew University in Jerusalem and was trained as a postdoctoral Fellow with Professor Jason Cyster in UCSF . In 2014, she joined the University of Oxford to establish her own group. Her research focuses on understanding basic mechanisms that regulate lymphocyte trafficking and B cell responses.

In recent years, a previously unappreciated subset of non-recirculating memory B cells have been shown to develop and persist in the lungs of influenza infected hosts. To study the microanatomical distribution of these cells in the lung and to explore mechanisms that activate them during rechallenge, we developed mouse models and imaging procedures to directly trace resident memory B cells in situ, in live lungs of influenza infected mice. Our study revealed that, upon re-challenge, an alveolar macrophage orchestrated cascade of events leads to an accumulation of resident memory B cells within sites of infection, a process that culminates in the differentiation of plasma cells in these regions. Given that one plasma cell can secret thousands of antibodies per minute, this process may represent a powerful mechanism to efficiently block viral dissemination.

This webinar will take place in the Kings Hedges Room please contact seminars@babraham.ac.uk to request site access

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