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An Interdisciplinary Research Centre at the University of Cambridge
 
Read more at: New doctoral research funding initiative to tackle antimicrobial resistance – Ineos Oxford Institute for AMR, University of Oxford and University of Cambridge

New doctoral research funding initiative to tackle antimicrobial resistance – Ineos Oxford Institute for AMR, University of Oxford and University of Cambridge

1 June 2022

A new Oxbridge PhD programme: The Ineos Oxford Institute for Antimicrobial Research (IOI) has this week launched a new doctoral initiative with the University of Oxford and University of Cambridge, to train the next generation of cutting-edge antimicrobial resistance researchers. The successful candidates will be fully...


Read more at: Meet the winner: Smart Probiotics to fight Antimicrobial Resistance – AMR Sandpit 2021

Meet the winner: Smart Probiotics to fight Antimicrobial Resistance – AMR Sandpit 2021

20 April 2022

Last November 2021, Cambridge Infectious Diseases hosted a Research Sandpit focused on Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) topics. The event was directed to the early career researchers in the network and CID offered a pump-priming grant to the best proposal coming up from the Sandpit. Here, we are interviewing the winners.


Read more at: Cambridge Festival: 'In conversation with SARS-CoV-2 variant hunters’, a summary by COG-UK

Cambridge Festival: 'In conversation with SARS-CoV-2 variant hunters’, a summary by COG-UK

13 April 2022

In the 2022 edition of the Cambridge Festival, Cambridge Infectious Diseases joined COVID-19 Genomics UK (COG-UK) to contribute with an online talk: 'A conversation with the SARS-CoV-2 variant hunters' , by Prof Sharon Peacock and Dr Katerina Galai. Access the webinar recording and an event summary at the COG-UK website.


Read more at: CID Annual Symposium: bringing back in-person connections

CID Annual Symposium: bringing back in-person connections

31 March 2022

On the 9th of March, Cambridge Infectious Diseases successfully celebrated its Annual Symposium . Finally, after two years of break, we could bring back talks to the stage and face-to-face discussions in diverse areas related to infectious diseases. Read the summary.


Read more at: Meet the winner: Kathryn Bowers and mathematical models for human epidemics – Summer Studentship 2021

Meet the winner: Kathryn Bowers and mathematical models for human epidemics – Summer Studentship 2021

27 January 2022

In 2021, Cambridge Infectious Diseases organised a competition for undergraduates to submit research proposals for a summer studentship . After evaluating the submissions, CID awarded the grant to Kathryn Bowers , a BA student in Mathematics. We have asked her about her summer project experience.


Read more at: UCam News: The video ‘What impact will your next connection have?’ highlights the importance of interdisciplinary research

UCam News: The video ‘What impact will your next connection have?’ highlights the importance of interdisciplinary research

7 October 2021

The video called ‘What impact will your next connection have?’ encourages researchers to get involved in the lively network of cross-School initiatives at the University.


Read more at: A futurist method for detecting potentially dangerous bugs in freshwater systems
A futurist method for detecting potentially dangerous bugs in freshwater systems

A futurist method for detecting potentially dangerous bugs in freshwater systems

19 January 2021

Climate change, rising urbanisation and agricultural intensification lead to global depletions of safe drinking water resources, and consequently reinforce the need for comprehensive monitoring frameworks.


Read more at: Evolution and geographical spread of a Tasmanian devil transmissible cancer
Evolution and geographical spread of a Tasmanian devil transmissible cancer

Evolution and geographical spread of a Tasmanian devil transmissible cancer

24 November 2020

A new paper from the Transmissible Cancer Group at the University of Cambridge Department of Veterinary Medicine reveals how a transmissible cancer has spread through the Tasmanian devil population, and how this cancer’s genome has evolved and diversified during it evolution.


Read more at: A Tale of Two Cesspits: DNA Reveals Intestinal Health in Medieval Europe and the Middle East
A Tale of Two Cesspits: DNA Reveals Intestinal Health in Medieval Europe and the Middle East

A Tale of Two Cesspits: DNA Reveals Intestinal Health in Medieval Europe and the Middle East

7 October 2020

New research proves the feasibility of retrieving bacterial DNA from ancient latrines Analysis of 14 th -15 th century latrines in Jerusalem and Riga, Latvia identifies some of the microbes resident in the guts of these pre-industrial populations, illuminating how gut contents have changed since medieval times. A new study...


Read more at: University of Cambridge’s Prof Jonathan Heeney answers call from Bill Gates to transform flu vaccine

University of Cambridge’s Prof Jonathan Heeney answers call from Bill Gates to transform flu vaccine

8 October 2019

Scientific teams from inside and outside the world of influenza research have been awarded funding to try to unlock mysteries that could provide the foundationfor a future universal flu vaccine, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the philanthropy Flu Lab have announced. Professor Jonathan Heeney, the Laboratory of...