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Cambridge Infectious Diseases

An Interdisciplinary Research Centre at the University of Cambridge

Studying at Cambridge

 

Infectious Disease Dynamics

Epidemiology and Mathematical Modelling provide vital mathematical and statistical tools to study the spatial spread of epidemics in populations. Mathematics and simulation are essential tools in infectious disease control, enabling decision-makers to explore control policies before implementing them, interpret trends, and predict emerging threats. Over recent years technological advances and worldwide efforts are speeding up developments towards better global surveillance for combating pandemics of emergent and re-emergent infectious diseases. Here at Cambridge our researchers, extending from medicine and molecular biology to computer science and applied mathematics, are teaming up to develop new models and applied tools for rapid assessment of potentially urgent situations.

Explore Campus

Research groups are found across several university departments and local research institutes, and include:

 

People specializing in this area

Co-Chairs

Professor James Wood

Emergence and epidemiology of infectious diseases

Operations Group

Professor P John Clarkson, FREng

Modelling and analysis of complex activity-based processes

Professor James Wood

Emergence and epidemiology of infectious diseases

Steering Committee

Professor P John Clarkson, FREng

Modelling and analysis of complex activity-based processes

Professor James Wood

Emergence and epidemiology of infectious diseases

Principal Investigators

Professor P John Clarkson, FREng

Modelling and analysis of complex activity-based processes

Dr Petra Klepac
  • •Integration epidemiological and demographic processes into a unified framework to understand the role of demography as an important epidemiological driver.
    •Incorporating economic constraints into epidemiological models to investigate the combined economic and epidemic dynamics of vaccination.
    •Drawing on game theory and theory of self-enforcing international agreements to identify the levels of international cooperation necessary to reach optimal and more uniform regional vaccination coverage.
  • Integration of epidemiological and demographic processes into a unified framework to understand the role of demography as an important epidemiological driver.
  • Incorporating economic constraints into epidemiological models to investigate the combined economic and epidemic dynamics of vaccination.
  • Drawing on game theory and theory of self-enforcing international agreements to identify the levels of international cooperation necessary to reach optimal and more uniform regional vaccination coverage.
Dr Flavio Toxvaerd

The economics of infectious diseases

Dr Caroline Trotter

Epidemiology and control of bacterial meningitis and other vaccine-preventable infections

Professor James Wood

Emergence and epidemiology of infectious diseases

Postdoctoral Researchers

Dr Petra Klepac
  • •Integration epidemiological and demographic processes into a unified framework to understand the role of demography as an important epidemiological driver.
    •Incorporating economic constraints into epidemiological models to investigate the combined economic and epidemic dynamics of vaccination.
    •Drawing on game theory and theory of self-enforcing international agreements to identify the levels of international cooperation necessary to reach optimal and more uniform regional vaccination coverage.
  • Integration of epidemiological and demographic processes into a unified framework to understand the role of demography as an important epidemiological driver.
  • Incorporating economic constraints into epidemiological models to investigate the combined economic and epidemic dynamics of vaccination.
  • Drawing on game theory and theory of self-enforcing international agreements to identify the levels of international cooperation necessary to reach optimal and more uniform regional vaccination coverage.

Cambridge researchers support the WHO

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Scientists build a clearer picture of the spread of bovine tuberculosis

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Original sin and the risk of epidemics

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How quickly things spread

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Cartographers of the infectious world

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Defending crops with maths

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